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I Hate Earth Day

"Hippies… hippies… they're everywhere… they want to save the earth but all they do is smoke pot and smell bad." — Eric Cartman, South Park episode 53.

On this Earth Day it's important to read Dr. George Reisman's essay The Toxicity of Environmentalism (now 14 years old; not all the science therein turned out to be accurate, but the philosophy is spot on):

The doctrine of intrinsic value is itself only a rationalization for a preexisting hatred of man. It is invoked not because one attaches any actual value to what is alleged to have intrinsic value, but simply to serve as a pretext for denying values to man. For example, caribou feed upon vegetation, wolves eat caribou, and microbes attack wolves. Each of these, the vegetation, the caribou, the wolves, and the microbes, is alleged by the environmentalists to possess intrinsic value. Yet absolutely no course of action is indicated for man. Should man act to protect the intrinsic value of the vegetation from destruction by the caribou? Should he act to protect the intrinsic value of the caribou from destruction by the wolves? Should he act to protect the intrinsic value of the wolves from destruction by the microbes? Even though each of these alleged intrinsic values is at stake, man is not called upon to do anything. When does the doctrine of intrinsic value serve as a guide to what man should do? Only when man comes to attach value to something. Then it is invoked to deny him the value he seeks. For example, the intrinsic value of the vegetation et al. is invoked as a guide to man's action only when there is something man wants, such as oil, and then, as in the case of Northern Alaska, its invocation serves to stop him from having it. In other words, the doctrine of intrinsic value is nothing but a doctrine of the negation of human values. It is pure nihilism.


Happily, many environmentalists are suffering from political infighting these days, which affords them less time spent protecting the environment from people:

In recent years, a growing faction has urged a tougher stance on immigration, calling the growing U.S. population and its consumption of natural resources the greatest threat to the environment.

They've got it backwards. Environmentalism is the greatest threat to the growing U.S. population and its consumption of natural resources.


Oh, and I rather enjoyed this image. (Via an InstaPundit link, though I forget which one.)

Tiny Island